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The folks at Healthy Goods have a passion for healthy living. Their mission has always been to find the highest quality, naturopathic, herbal, and whole-food supplements that support the body's innate wisdom to heal. Seeking out the best nutrient-dense, raw, certified-organic, and Non-GMO superfoods from exotic locations around the world, Healthy Goods brings its customers better health the way nature intended - from food.

Healthy Goods is located in Central Oregon, where its warehouse sits nestled between mountain ranges, forests, rivers, lakes, and high desert terrain. It is the perfect location for the adventure-loving, eco-conscious, and health focused team to find inspiration.

Healthy Goods also believes that its responsibility to customer health goes beyond the products it offers. This year, Healthy Goods celebrates its fifth year as a member of the Carbonfree® Business Partnership Program, offsetting the carbon footprint of delivering products to its customers.  

Years ago, the Healthy Goods team recognized that their healthy diet options often came from distant lands, thus increasing the carbon footprint due to packaging materials and shipping emissions.  In order to reduce these emissions, Healthy Goods took several steps to reuse and recycle shipping cartons and packing materials wherever possible, use recycled paper tape for sealing shipments and recyclable fill materials instead of bubble wrap and Styrofoam peanuts.  Then, to neutralize the remaining shipping emissions, Healthy Goods joined the Carbonfree® Business Partnership program five years ago.  The Carbonfree® Partner program makes it simple and affordable for Healthy Goods to mitigate its remaining operational emissions, including all shipping emissions and all employee commuting emissions, on an annual basis.       

"As individuals, we're extremely excited about the locavore movement. But since Healthy Goods specializes in superfoods that are typically grown in exotic places, our company hasn't been able to participate,” explains Tom Burke, CEO of Healthy Goods.  “By purchasing carbon offsets from Carbonfund.org, we're able to import and deliver our foods to the ultimate consumer carbon-free. Our products now have a smaller carbon footprint than foods delivered by farmers to the local farmers' market!"

Healthy Goods also participates in their power company’s Blue SkySM Renewable Energy program, which supports a blend of 100% Pacific Northwest renewable resources from Oregon, Washington, and Idaho.  This initiative further neutralizes Healthy Goods’ annual operational emissions, and together with the Carbonfree® Business Partnership, underscores Healthy Goods’ leadership position as a truly sustainable provider of healthy raw vegan foods, supplements and personal care products. 

Published in carbonfree blog
Friday, 08 June 2012 11:45

Five Ways to be Chic and Eco-Friendly

There’s quite a bit of buzz in the news about eco-friendly clothing, but you may be asking yourself why.  Here are five reasons to go green with your clothing choices. 

1)      Keep toxic chemicals off your skin.  Did you know that conventional cotton uses 25% of the world's pesticides?  Those same pesticides can be harmful to you if they are absorbed through your skin.  Seek out Certified Organic textiles that are grown without the use of pesticides, herbicides, or synthetic fertilizers, and are certified by an international governing body such as Control Union, Institute for Marketecology (IMO) or One-Cert.

2)      Get informed about the labor and shipping practices employed to make the clothes you buy.  All those pesticides already mentioned, well, they’re not good for you or the farmers that grow cotton using them.  Also keep in mind where the clothes were manufactured, which you can often find on the label.  Think about all the greenhouse gas emissions generated if that t-shirt you’re considering had to be shipped across the ocean.

3)      Buy antibacterial and durable clothing – it’ll save you money and keep you healthier in the long-run.  Bamboo fabric can have up to a 99.8% antibacterial rate.  This reduces bacteria that thrive in clothing and cause unpleasant odors.  So you’ll smell better and be less likely to have a skin infection or allergic reaction.  Tencel is a completely biodegradable fabric that retains its shape after its first washing and is naturally wrinkle resistant.  Its durability is maintained whether wet or dry.

4)      The earth has finite resources; buy clothes that are sustainable.  Polyester is mainly made out of oil, which is not a renewable resource, and to make matters worse it is not biodegradable either.  Sustainable textiles include organic cotton, hemp, bamboo, and soy fabrics.

5)      Lastly, consider vintage clothing.  Buying clothing that was chosen once before is environmentally friendly, and a great way to maximize your clothing budget.  If you need an outfit for a special event, check out a consignment store first.  Oftentimes, they’ll help you find what you’re looking for because they have the time and staff that know the available stock.

If you prefer to buy new, look for clothing that is created with reclaimed, recycled, and vintage materials.

Shopping for clothes has an often overlooked environmental impact.  It pays for us to use our purchasing power to make ourselves chic and reduce our carbon footprint.

Learn more about eco-friendly fabrics here: http://www.the-eco-market.com/eco-friendly-fabrics.html.

Published in carbonfree blog