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Summer vacation travel is winding down, and many will suffer the sore backs and shoulders that come with carting luggage and sports equipment through airports, hotels, and in and out of cars.  This pain and hassle can be avoided, thanks to two guys who met in high school and spent their share of time schlepping bags while traveling.  They formed Luggage Forward, providing guaranteed door-to-door luggage and sports equipment delivery to more than 200 countries worldwide, allowing clients the convenience of traveling without their luggage.

Five years ago, Luggage Forward took another progressive step to improve the sustainability of their service.  Through Carbonfund.org’s CarbonFree® Shipping program, Luggage Forward allows clients to offset the carbon dioxide emissions generated from the airplanes, trucks and trains that are used in the shipment of each bag.

“We’re pleased to offer clients who send their luggage with Luggage Forward the opportunity to help in the fight against climate change by purchasing carbon offsets,” says Zeke Adkins, co-founder of Luggage Forward.  “Considering the environmental impact of carbon emissions, we believe that taking these steps is a matter of basic corporate responsibility.”  

Luggage Forward was born out of the simple idea that we should all be able to enjoy the journey as much as the destination, by eliminating long waits, the aggravation of lost luggage and the burden of carrying heavy bags.  Forwarding luggage allows you to save time at the airport by avoiding the long check-in lines and skipping the wait at the baggage carousel. When you send your luggage with Luggage Forward, it is guaranteed to arrive on time or they’ll refund your money and give you up to $500 per bag to make it right.  And with the CarbonFree® Shipping program, you can make it right by the environment by neutralizing the carbon emissions created by shipping your bag.

Published in carbonfree blog
Monday, 10 June 2013 12:02

Jellyfish: the Ocean’s Canaries

Some may think jellyfish are simply a pesky problem when we want to take a swim or snorkel, but they are actually a sign of flagging oceanic health.  We think of them as the canary in the coal mine.  The difference is the canary dies when there is a problem, but jellyfish flourish in the conditions that global warming wreaks on our oceans.

Climate change heats and acidifies the planet’s oceans.  Overfishing adds to the first two major problems.  All three contribute to creating an ideal environment for jellyfish to thrive and multiply.  So what’s the big deal if there are too many jellyfish?

The issue is that jellyfish take a bad situation and make it worse.  They have a unique trait where they’re able to eat up the food chain.  This is surprising considering these sea creatures don’t even have brains.  However, they actually can consume animals that are bigger, smarter and faster than they are.  They damage the ecosystem further by competing with large mammals, such as whales, by feeding on the same fish and plankton that these other animals need to survive.

Marine expert Lisa-ann Gershwin wrote the new book Stung! On Jellyfish Blooms and the Future of the Ocean.  She points to an example where jellyfish wiped out an entire food chain simply by eating from the bottom up. 

The jellyfish species Mnemiopsis leidyi was accidentally introduced into the Black Sea in the early 1980s.  In just a few short years, these jellyfish comprised “95 per cent of the biomass in the Black Sea”.  This means “ninety-five per cent of every living thing was this one species of jellyfish”.

Jellyfish could rule our planet’s oceans as they once did in the Precambrian era.  A time when biodiversity was low, the jellyfish commanded the oceans, and mammals and reptiles did not exist.  This is a scary eventuality, that our feet are firmly planted on the path towards.  We need to heed the warnings that these gelatinous invertebrates provide and begin seriously reducing our carbon footprints and offsetting the rest of our carbon emissions.

Published in carbonfree blog

This Sunday approximately 35,000 protesters gathered on the National Mall to march past the White House and demand action on climate change.  The Forward on Climate Change march was said to be the largest climate rally in U.S. history.  Protestors organized by groups such as Sierra Club and 350.org’s aim was to urge President Obama to reject the Keystone XL pipeline project and set limits on carbon pollution from both new and existing power plants.  Last year, the EPA proposed limits only on new plants.

For quite some time, Congress has remained gridlocked on the issue of climate change.  President Obama has promised to tackle the problem on more than one occasion, but perhaps we the people should consider the effect we can have on bringing about meaningful change.  Top down efforts are certainly necessary, but we should all be supporting more bottom up efforts as well.  After all, that’s how broad changes have been achieved before. 

Take for instance the Civil Rights movement.  The White House and Congress were encouraged to overcome their extensive political reservations and bring about true change on the issues of racial equality and voting rights only after a strong grass-roots movement led at the local level by activists such as the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. changed public opinion and made it politically unacceptable to do nothing.

There are other examples of successful grass-roots movements, but the core message is that we have to begin leveraging our bottom up power.  This weekend’s rally was a great start.  Let’s build on the momentum and begin organized, local activism, especially in the districts and states of those members of Congress that are hesitant to act on global warming. 

We cannot expect President Obama to do all of the work on combating climate change.  Everyone can do their part at the local level and even in their own homes.  Let’s also lessen the demand for energy.  We live in such a blessed country, but using less energy and being more efficient is in everyone’s best interests.  Here are some good ways to start reducing your carbon footprint, and then you can also go carbon neutral and offset the rest.

Published in carbonfree blog

The Carbonfund.org Foundation is honored to receive the support of Forever Cheese for the 6th year in a row.  Since 2007, Forever Cheese has supported wind energy, reforestation and renewable energy projects through Carbonfund.org Foundation.  In fact, with 2012’s support, Forever Cheese has offset over 1,645 metric tons of CO2 and over 7,099 Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) of green power.

To put this support into perspective, the six years that Forever Cheese has supported emission reduction projects is equivalent to removing almost 1,400 cars off the road for a year or to the electricity that almost 1,000 homes would use in a year.  It is also similar to recycling almost 2,500 tons of waste instead of sending it to a landfill. (Source: EPA  http://www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/energy-resources/calculator.html

In 2012 Forever Cheese took their support a step further. For Earth Day 2012 Forever Cheese stepped up and set the bar for Carbonfund.org partners by planting 7,500 trees globally.  Tree planting projects sequester CO2 from the atmosphere, prevent erosion, protect biodiversity, and provide renewable resources for local communities. Planting trees provides flood control by minimizing runoff and the loss of top soil, provides habitat and nutrition for wildlife and nurseries for local fish populations, and offers alternative economic livelihoods for local communities in the form of managing tree nurseries and planting, assisting with regulation of the water and nutrient cycle.

Co founder, Michele Buster, remarks “We are committed to wind energy as a solution for the future and reforestation as well.  We know that we can make a greater impact as a company than as single individuals.  We’d like to feel that we serve as a role model in our industry to incentivize others to support renewable energy resources.”

Carbonfund.org is grateful for the six years of partnership with Forever Cheese - a company showing an important example of how business can be part of critical climate change solutions.

About Forever Cheese:  Forever Cheese, founded in 1998, is committed to sourcing the finest cheeses and specialty foods from Italy, Spain, Portugal and Croatia. The company represents exclusively the following brands: Fulvi®, Dehesa Cordobesa®, El Trigal®, Drunken Goat®, Ca De Ambros®, Bonati, Italfine, Caro, Cacao Sampaka, Casa Pareja, CARM and Mitica®. Forever Cheese products can be found in the finest specialty food shops and restaurants across the country.  www.forevercheese.com -30-

Published in carbonfree blog

The United States is one of the richest and most powerful nations in the world.  What can our country do for the good of the planet with this role?

One thing the U.S. federal government does every few years is engage hundreds of experts to evaluate the impacts of climate change, now and in the future.  The resulting National Climate Assessment report, which was recently released, showed that America's current efforts to reduce carbon pollution are too little to avoid dangerous climate change.  Last year President Obama announced new CAFE (Corporate Average Fuel Economy) standards for cars and light trucks such as minivans and sport utility vehicles.  Let’s build on this historic progress to limit carbon emissions.  There are several ways that the president and federal government can make a real difference in the fight against global warming.

The Clean Air Act is a powerful tool that our nation’s leaders could be leveraging more fully.  The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with using the Clean Air Act to issue rules to reduce greenhouse pollution.  This farsighted law has reduced damaging air pollution for forty years, saving many lives.  The EPA has already used it to protect public health and welfare from six extensive and harmful pollutants including: ozone, particulate matter, sulfur and nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and lead.  Now is the time to lower atmospheric carbon dioxide levels by setting a national pollution cap for greenhouse gases.

Under the Clean Air Act, the EPA has also proposed higher emission standards on coal-fired power plants.  These standards need to be fortified, finalized and implemented posthaste.  Why stop with power plants?  There are other places where higher greenhouse gas emission standards can be successfully applied to help save our planet such as oil refineries, cement plants, and even the airline industry.

Another way to help the environment would be for President Obama and the State Department to decline approval on the Keystone XL pipeline, which proposes moving oil down from Canada through the western United States to refineries along the Gulf Coast.  There are no guarantees that the pipeline won’t spring leaks.  Furthermore, there is evidence that extracting oil from the sands are increasing levels of cancer-causing compounds in surrounding lakes far beyond natural levels.  Denying approval would show that America is committed to transitioning away from a dependence on fossil fuels.

Of course, it’s not all up to the federal government.  We can all do our parts to speed the transition to a clean energy future.  First we can encourage our elected officials to take the climate change actions recommended above.  Second we can reduce our own carbon footprints.  Consider lowering the heat or air conditioning depending on the season, using a clothesline, rake, hand mower and other manpowered devices, composting, forgoing meat at least one day a week and riding a bicycle.  Lastly, we can all find simple ways to be part of the solution such as planting trees and offsetting remaining carbon emissions.

Published in carbonfree blog
Saturday, 22 December 2012 09:42

What is on the Planet’s Climate Wishlist?

The Earth cannot use words to speak for itself, but if it could what would be on its climate wishlist this holiday season?

Environmental activists and climate scientists have done a good job of communicating the risks of climate change.  Part of the issue is that it’s a delicate balance between scaring people so thoroughly that they don’t think there is anything they can do about global warming and encouraging people to make any changes that positively impact the environment, even small ones to start.  Perhaps we’ve also underestimated the importance of personal experience. 

The facts on climate change alone are not enough.  We’ve had solid, scientific evidence for many years that global warming is man-made and happening right now.  However, many people need to experience the effects for themselves in order for the light bulb to go off in their heads.  Hurricane Sandy and other extreme weather events are helping people to connect the dots, but now that process has begun the question then becomes, “What next?”

We have a responsibility to be good stewards of the planet.  That is what the climate needs and wants this holiday season.  There are two main changes that we can undertake to fulfill the planet’s climate wishlist.  The first is to lower our carbon footprints.  Ask yourself, do I really need to leave my lights on all day at home when I am not there?  Can I combine trips in the car to drive less or take public transportation instead?  What simple steps can I take to save energy and myself some money as well?

The second change is to offset the rest of your carbon footprint.  There are many affordable options to make this holiday season a reality, not just for the planet, but for future generations also.  Any positive steps you take are welcome and really do make a difference.  Although the planet cannot use words to thank you, reducing what you can and offsetting the rest is a beautiful gift and a wonderful place to start this holiday season.

Published in carbonfree blog

In a telling and ironic move, coal industry giant BHP-Billiton, is replacing one of its coal export facilities in Queensland, Australia because of its vulnerability to increasingly frequent hurricanes from global warming.  BHP-Billiton is an Australian coal company that produces one-fifth of globally traded coal for steel making and is the largest mining company on Earth.  The upgrade represents a major investment in planning for climate change.  In fact, the company’s coal operations are led by Marcus Randolph, who confirmed they are planning, “to rebuild the facility to be more durable to climate change.”

Readers of this blog already know that increasingly extreme weather events are the result of climate change in addition to the fact that many businesses are planning now for climate change’s effects.  Why not a coal company too?  The announcement makes it obvious that BHP-Billiton understands that climate change is real and the time is now to begin making changes even if the manufacture of their product contributes to the issue.

Randolph has even warned investors about the implications of remaining dependent on the non-renewable resources of fossil fuels by saying, “In a carbon constrained world where energy coal is the biggest contributor to a carbon problem, how do you think this is going to evolve over a 30- to 40-year time horizon? You'd have to look at that and say on balance, I suspect, the usage of thermal coal is going to decline. And frankly it should.”

When a company that mines and exports coal starts planning for climate change it means the writing is on the wall.  Businesses and individuals alike should all be working to decrease carbon footprints and offset the remaining carbon emissions.  Let’s give the planet a holiday present and start doing all we can this season to embrace a cleaner energy future.

Published in carbonfree blog

  

CarbonFree certification from NSF International and Carbonfund.org Foundation

demonstrate product is carbon-neutral  

            Sprint, LG Bring Users Carbon Neutral Cell Phone in Time for the Holidays

 

BETHESDA, Md., Nov. 12,  2012 — The Carbonfund.org Foundation applauded the announcement by LG Electronics USA and Sprint that the LG Mach smartphone with environmentally friendlier features will be available Nov. 11.  

LG Mach, available from Sprint for $99 with a two-year contract, has earned the CarbonFree® label under the rigorous product certification program offered by the Carbonfund.org Foundation and NSF International’s Sustainability division

With the CarbonFree Certified Product program, LG has offset the carbon footprint of the manufacturing of the LG Mach at no extra cost to the customer through the use of third-party verified carbon reduction projects

“Being part of the CarbonFree Certified Product program helps demonstrate LG’s overarching commitment to the environment” said Tom Bruursema, General Manager of NSF Sustainability.

“With its new CarbonFree certified mobile phone, LG is helping to fight climate change and continuing to provide consumers with cutting-edge products” stated Carbonfund.org president Eric Carlson.

The LG Mach is the latest carbon neutral product in a line of CarbonFree certified offerings. LG Electronics was the first in its industry to distribute home appliances, solar panels and other consumer electronics that were part of the CarbonFree Certified Product Program. These CarbonFreeCertified Products represent another step in LG's commitment to environmental sustainability and energy-efficient products and services, including a wide range of ENERGY STAR® -qualified appliances and electronics products.

 

# # # 

About LG Electronics USA: LG Electronics USA, Inc., based in Englewood Cliffs, N.J., is the North American subsidiary of LG Electronics, Inc., a $49 billion global force and technology leader in consumer electronics, home appliances and mobile communications. In the United States, LG Electronics sells a range of stylish and innovative mobile phones, home entertainment products,  home appliances, and air conditioning systems and energy solutions, all under LG’s “Life’s Good” marketing theme.  LG Electronics is a 2012 ENERGY STAR® Partner of the Year. For more information, please visit www.lg.com.

About Carbonfund.org Foundation: Carbonfund.org is a leading nonprofit climate solutions organization, making it easy and affordable for individuals, businesses and organizations to reduce their climate impact and hasten our transition to a low-carbon economy. Carbonfund.org supports innovative renewable energy, energy efficiency and forestry projects globally that reduce carbon emissions and help people. Carbonfund.org has worked with over 2,000 corporate and nonprofit partners. More at www.carbonfund.org.

About NSF International: NSF International is an independent organization that writes standards, tests and certifies products for the construction, food, water and consumer goods industries to minimize adverse health effects and protect the environment (nsf.org). NSF Sustainability (inserted hyperlink)  draws upon this expertise in standards development, product assurance and certification, advisory services and quality management systems to help companies green their products, operations, systems and supply chains. Product assessments include testing and certification for sustainable products such as green chemicals and building products. Through its National Center for Sustainability Standards, NSF also develops sustainability standards for products such as carpet, flooring, and other commercial building materials.

 

 

 

Published in carbonfree blog

It was a sad day in 2010 when Congress failed to pass cap-and-trade legislation.  However, a study by Dallas Burtraw, a senior fellow at Resources for the Future, released this month says that the failure had the unexpected consequence of helping to lower greenhouse gas emissions.  There are two reasons why U.S. carbon dioxide emissions are likely to be lower by 2020: regulatory measures and market changes.

This is not to say that there is no need for cap-and-trade or a carbon tax.  On the contrary, they are still necessary to achieve long-term cuts in emissions and to help establish worldwide support on the issue of climate change.  The American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 (ACES) was an energy bill that would cap the amount of carbon dioxide power plants and manufacturers could emit, and set up a system to trade for carbon offsets. 

When ACES failed in the Senate after receiving approval in the House of Representatives, a series of piecemeal measures were put into place.  This hodgepodge of regulatory measures put the U.S. on track to meet a pledge set by President Obama of cutting climate change emissions by 17 percent by the end of this decade.  The first of which this blog already covered is Groundbreaking Fuel Economy Standards.  President Obama pushed for higher vehicle fuel efficiency standards with automakers and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) when ACES died in the Senate.  Also, the president is pressing for higher emission standards on coal-fired power plants.

Further regulatory measures in the wake of national cap-and-trade’s demise include California and some Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic states establishing their own cap-and-trade programs, and 29 states setting clean-energy requirements for utilities. 

Market changes putting the U.S. on the path to lower carbon emissions by 2020 have been covered by this blog also.  Low natural gas prices have been shifting the market away from dirtier coal as power plants' fuel of choice. 

If ACES, also called the Waxman-Markey Bill, had passed the law would have barred the EPA from issuing carbon standards for power plants, refineries or factories.  Furthermore, it may have very well headed off establishing the higher vehicle fuel efficiency standards.  Lastly, under a national cap-and-trade program, any regional or state efforts would be offset by increased emissions elsewhere.

So the planet still needs further, faster and more wide ranging cuts in fossil-fuel use, but the U.S. is on the right path to curbing carbon emissions with the help of some regulatory measures and market changes.

Published in carbonfree blog
Thursday, 11 October 2012 12:55

Welcoming Macmillan Publishing

Carbonfund.org Foundation Welcomes Macmillan Publishing to the Large Business Partnership Program.

Macmillan is a group of publishing companies in the United States held by Verlagsgruppe Georg von Holtzbrinck, which is based in Stuttgart, Germany. American publishers include Farrar, Straus and Giroux, Henry Holt & Company, W.H. Freeman and Worth Publishers, Palgrave Macmillan, Bedford/St. Martin’s, Picador, Roaring Brook Press, St. Martin’s Press, Tor Books, and Macmillan Higher Education.

As a key component of its sustainability initiative, Macmillan has set a goal to reduce the CO2 emissions generated by its annual business activities by 65% (over a 2009 baseline) by the year 2020.  This includes the carbon emissions mitigation through Carbonfund.org including supporting renewable energy, forestry and biodiversity preservation.

Macmillan is well on track toward realizing this ambitious goal through the programs and actions undertaken to date.  Some examples are: 

  • Rationalizing sourcing of paper based on the CO2 profile of the various mills that manufacturer the specific grades that Macmillan uses in printing its books.
  • By mid-2013, completing the 3-year transition of their car fleet to 90%+ hybrid vehicles which will result in a reduction of over 800 metric tons of CO2 emissions per year from associated fuel savings.
  • Significant investment in lighting retrofits at distribution/returns facilities that are 45-50% more energy efficient than the replaced configurations.

“Sustainability is part of the very mission of our company. Not just as a press release, not just around the edges, but in the very fabric of the place. It is as important as growth, as important as profitability.  It may even be more important."

“While we’ve made great headway in reducing emissions in those areas under our immediate control, we know it will take a longer horizon to gain the required savings in areas where we wield influence, but cannot drive change just by force of will.  That’s why we have pursued a partnership with Carbonfund.org to mitigate our total annual emissions by offsetting approximately 25% of that total through our sponsorship and support of several of the creative, verified, and geographically diverse programs that they administer,” says John Sargent, CEO of Macmillan.

Macmillan sets an important example for the publishing industry in both internal and external carbon reduction initiatives.

About Macmillan (http://us.macmillan.com)

 

 

Published in carbonfree blog
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