press releases | carbonfund.org
CityRyde is helping lead the way to cleaner, healthier cities by putting the right incentives in the market for biking. In a guest post below, CityRyde explains how they are turning bike trips into cash. In 2009, CityRyde, a Carbonfund.org Partner, launched Spark—the world’s first off-the-shelf software solution designed to manage bike sharing systems at universities, corporate campuses and small municipalities. Now our newest software application built upon Spark's infrastructure named Inspire has arrived! Inspire turns bike share rides into cash through carbon credits. Inspire has been a work in progress by the CityRyde team over the last two years, backed by a robust carbon methodology which will remain in the voluntary market for now but scale into the compliance market by 2012. Inspire will undoubtedly become the gold standard for carbon credit tracking in sustainable transportation worldwide. Watch the audio/video tour of Inspire: www.inspiremobility.com/the-software A carbon credit is a financial instrument—a commodity—representing a reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. One carbon credit represents the reduction of one metric ton of carbon dioxide, or its equivalent in another GHG. The worldwide carbon credit market exceeded $120 billion dollars in value in 2009 and explosive growth is anticipated into 2010 and beyond. CityRyde Inspire integrates with existing bike sharing backends to access the data needed to process Inspire’s proprietary algorithms and certify the carbon credits. Every time a bike share ride is proven to have displaced a carbon-emitting mode of transportation a portion of a carbon credit is generated and collected by CityRyde Inspire. Due to the stringent and all-inclusive measures, Inspire ensures in its data point aggregation methodologies that bike share operators will be able to instantly turn the carbon credits generated from daily program operations into cash. And bike rides are merely the first application—Inspire will scale into other sustainable transportation verticals into the future such as electric scooter, car sharing, etc. The possibilities are endless... Jason Meinzer, CityRyde COO & Co-Founder states, "Funding a bike share program is a recurring barrier to entry. Creating an additional revenue stream through the sale of carbon offset credits via Inspire will help alleviate such a financial burden, and make bike sharing in most any deployment environment that much more realistic and sustainable." Contact CityRyde now at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to learn more…e.g., how Inspire could bring in close to one million dollars in carbon credits through a bike share program such as the Velib in Paris.
CauseWorld is a mobile application that allows you to donate to charities of your choice, free of cost to you, while you shop. As you visit various stores, you accumulate "karmas" which can then be used for donations to charitable CauseWorldorganizations. CauseWorld just got another contribution from corporate sponsor Citi which put its total contribution to the application at $700,000.  It seems pleased with the app's performance - it has been downloaded over 300,000 times and large companies like Citi and Kraft are turning those karmas into real dollars. Some of the many actions that can be supported on the CauseWorld application include donating to classrooms in need, offsetting carbon dioxide emissions (that's us!), providing a meal for the hungry, or helping an injured animal. No purchase is required and it is available for the iPhone and Android phones. Let's continue the success of CauseWorld and its generous sponsors: download the application today and start reducing your carbon emissions!
Tuesday, 15 March 2011 14:09

CIFOR – Thinking Beyond the Canopy

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In Cameroon, the amount of timber harvested since 1996 has increased by a factor of 10, making logging a significant economic player in this African country. However, nearly 75% of that timber is harvested illegally, a practice that threatens the very resource the nation depends on. The Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) is shedding light and knowledge on what they’re calling “Cameroon’s Hidden Harvest,” highlighting the degradation of the local environment while also pointing out that over 45,000 people in the local community depend on such practices to support their families. CIFOR’s research draws attention to the fact that while moving toward stronger deforestation laws is critical to our environment and combating climate change, the human element at economic risk cannot be ignored and must be part of the story in the path to more sustainable development techniques. The Center for International Forestry Research is a nonprofit, global facility dedicated to advancing human well-being, environmental conservation and equity, and Carbonfund.org is proud to partner with CIFOR for another year to support the research facility in a different capacity – helping mitigate the carbon footprint of the organization’s corporate emissions. CIFOR’s work is particularly critical for many of the forest projects that Carbonfund.org supports, and we are pleased to support their mission. Operating around the world, and primarily in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, CIFOR provides important analysis to help policy makers improve forest management techniques from the viewpoint of the people whose livelihoods depend on forests for agriculture, infrastructure, and trade. A real eye-opener is “deforestation counter” on CIFOR’s homepage, which showed me that during the short time I spent on their site learning about their programs, 3,600 hectares of forest were lost. This is staggering, to say the least. We encourage everyone to follow the important work of CIFOR, which is now easier than ever with three new Facebook pages: one in English that is focused internationally, one in Spanish focused on Latin America and another in French focused on Africa. Likewise, they have launched three new Twitter feeds in English, French and Spanish. To learn more about the important forestry issues affecting our world today, check out the thoughtful and informative articles on the CIFOR blog.
Thursday, 18 June 2009 17:38

Soylar for Candles Made with Sun Energy

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Soylar Candles is an online marketplace offering eco-friendly soy candles and gifts made in a solar powered home. Every candle is housed in reused and reclaimed jars that have been collected from local families and day-cares and then cleaned with non-toxic cleaners. All of their product packaging is plant-based, biodegradable and renewable. Soylar uses 100% sugar cane box containers and natural plant cellophane rolls, bags and tape. For all of the emissions that they can not reduce, Soylar Candles has joined our partner program to offset their shipping and other carbon dioxide emissions. In addition to these amazing sustainability and offset programs, Soylar Candles is a 1% For the Planet member and donates 1% of its annual profits to environmental programs. Being a family-run business, Soylar is run from the home of Irene Guoz who has installed a 3.3 kw solar system for her house. Irene also does tours through her home to teach people about the benefits of solar power and sustainability. Just this past May, her home was featured in the 2nd annual Long Beach Sustainability and Solar Conference & Tour. To learn more about Soylar Candles and to browse their amazing selection of candles, gift baskets, and reusable bags, please visit their website.
Carbonfund.org has always believed that it’s Your Carbon, Your Choice™. So how do you choose? Take a page from the Society for College and University Planning’s book. They gave all the readers of their blog the opportunity to vote on whether they want to support our Reforestation, Renewable Energy, or Energy Efficiency projects. And the winner? Reforestation in a landslide, at least so far. Use this blog posting thread to tell us how you chose which project type to support.
Logo-color2If you, a family member, or someone else you know is an employee of the federal government, donations can still be made to the Combined Federal Campaign to approved charities. Carbonfund.org is an approved charity of the government’s donations drive. It’s a great way to support our carbon offset projects, in renewable energy, energy efficiency as well as reforestation, located in different areas of the country. Our CFC# is 62681. Make your donation today to fight global warming, and remember to keep us in mind for your future CFC donations. You can learn more about the CFC campaign at www.opm.gov/CFC.
Friday, 01 January 2010 13:22

Chino Basin Dairy Farm Biodigester

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Chino Basin Dairy Farm Biodigester

Project Name:: Chino Basin Dairy Farm Biodigester

Location: Chino Basin, California Project type: Waste-to-Energy Biodigester Standard: American Carbon Registry / Environmental Resources Trust’s Monitoring, Reporting & Verification Protocol Verification/Validation: Environmental Resources Trust

Environmental Benefits

  • Mitigates climate change
  • Waste management
  • Odor control and less localized air pollution
  • Reduction of local water pollution

Community Benefits

  • Locally sourced, renewable energy
  • Development of new technologies and additional jobs created

Project Description

Carbonfund.org supports the Chino Basin Dairy Farm Biodigester Project because it helps to reduce methane emissions and lessens the impact of global climate change. Biodigesters capture the methane generated by manure and transform it into a clean, renewable energy source. This particular biodigester collects manure from ten local dairy farms and is responsible for reducing more than 8,000 tons of CO2 equivalent emissions from the atmosphere every year, while also supporting local farmers and protecting the quality of the region’s groundwater.

From 2003 to 2009, the Chino Basin Dairy Farm Biodigester mitigated nearly 30,000 metric tons of CO2. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Climate Leaders Program notes that more than two billion livestock exist in the US and account for 7% for anthropogenic methane emissions.

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Friday, 10 September 2010 16:52

China Urges Collaboration in Solving Climate Change

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China's Vice Premier, Li Keqiang, said today that the international community needs to work together to overcome the challenges of climate change, working within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC/Copenhagen) and Kyoto Protocol while respecting the principle of "common but differentiated responsibilities." Li was referring to China having signed on earlier this year to the Copenhagen Accord, which essentially calls for limiting the rise in global temperatures to no more than 2 degrees Celsius beyond pre-industrial levels. China has said it plans to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide per unit of economic growth, or "carbon intensity," by 40 to 45 percent by 2020, compared with 2005 levels. India also signed on to the Accord and set an intensity reduction target of 20 to 25 percent by 2020, compared with 2005 levels, excluding its agricultural sector. The United States has pledged to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by about 17 percent by 2020 (a target that is not tied to economic growth or carbon intensity) from 2005 levels. Li made his remarks in conjunction with briefing UNFCCC Executive Secretary Christiana Figueres in Beijing on the country's present policies and measures to reduce energy consumption, develop green jobs and promote environmental protection. China will host a session of the follow-up U.N. climate change talks in Tianjin this October. Currently, China’s energy consumption is growing faster than any other country’s, but on a per-person basis, China still consumes far less energy than other leading economies such as the U.S. To produce more clean energy and mitigate climate impact, China, already the world's largest manufacturer of solar panels, aims to produce 20,000 megawatts of solar energy by 2020. Together with wind power and biomass, renewable energy in China is expected to contribute about eight percent, or double the current level, of electricity generation in less than a decade. However, improvements have come with substantial costs. Upgrading the country's electricity grid alone cost China last year about $45 billion.