press releases | carbonfund.org
Tuesday, 22 February 2011 10:44

Anvil Knitwear: Fashion Forward and Eco Conscious

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Anvil Knitwear, a century-old apparel brand, has joined the fast-growing Business for Innovative Climate & Energy Policy (BICEP) coalition. Anvil becomes the 20th member of BICEP, a group of major American companies committed to working with businesses and policymakers to enact meaningful energy and climate policies. For Anvil, joining BICEP is an important next step toward ensuring sustainable global growth. BICEP’s core principles call for reducing greenhouse gases, promoting energy efficiency, and supporting creation of a globally competitive clean energy economy. Anvil’s practices have long been aligned with these principles; the company has taken steps to measure, reduce and report on its own environmental footprint. Anvil's eco collection is comprised of 15 environmentally friendly t-shirts, fleeces and bags, including the AnvilOrganic® line made with 100 percent organic cotton. The AnvilRecycled™ tee, made from 69 percent pre-consumer recycled cotton, is certified CarbonFree® by Carbonfund.org and was the first carbon-neutral recycled cotton t-shirt on the market. BICEP is coordinated by Ceres, a national network of investors, environmental organizations and other public interest groups working with companies and investors to address sustainability challenges such as global climate change. While Anvil is the newest BICEP member, it joined Ceres and adopted its principles in 2007. Within months of its founding with just five charter members, BICEP became a leading business voice for comprehensive energy and climate policy in the last Congress where such legislation came closer than ever to becoming a reality. The U.S. House passed comprehensive legislation in June 2009, and a Senate coalition headed by Democrat John Kerry of Massachusetts and Independent Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut sponsored similar legislation for the Senate. The Obama administration has also been active in pushing for comprehensive energy and climate action.
Anvil Knitwear has always been a champion for responsible business and has been an important partner to Carbonfund.org since 2009. Made from 69% pre-consumer recycled cotton, AnvilRecycled is Certified CarbonFree®. Anvil calculated the carbon footprint of the recycled t-shirt and is reducing and off-setting the carbon emissions of each shirt sold through our 3 year and counting partnership. But Anvil is doing so much more to lead the global green movement. In October 2011, Anvil Knitwear teamed up with fashion designer Vivienne Westwood and the United Nations Environment Program’s (UNEP) GreenUp campaign to help Europe to ‘GreenUp’ as the world looks towards the UN Conference on Sustainable Development in June 2012. Vivienne Westwood’s Tree-shirts, printed on the AnvilOrganic(TM) and AnvilRecycled(R) line, will raise funds for reforestation efforts in Europe. “Buy a Tree-shirt, Plant a Tree” is the first of 10 actions of GreenUp. Tree-shirts are available exclusively on www.yoox.com, giving all net sale proceeds for the program. Follow the campaign on Twitter @UNEPGreenUp for monthly citizen actions on what you can do to help make a green economy! Also, in May 2011, Anvil Knitwear was awarded “Best First Time Report” by Ceres and the Association for Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) for North America at the Ceres conference in Oakland, California. And, in December 2011, they will be releasing their 2011 CSR Progress Report that debuts Anvil’s first Water Footprint Assessment. Anvil Knitwear, Inc., an American brand since 1899, is a leading manufacturer of sportswear and accessories, with a proven track record in engaging in responsible business practices. The company is also a leader in the sustainable apparel industry with its AnvilOrganic® and AnvilSustainable™ brands. Anvil has been ranked by the Textile Exchange as the world's seventh-largest organic program and it is the largest domestic purchaser of U.S.-grown certified organic cotton. Anvil offers a wide variety of affordable styles made from fibers such as certified organic cotton, transitional cotton, recycled cotton, and recycled PET bottles and blends in addition to over 70 traditional styles. For more information, please visit www.anvilknitwear.com, www.anvilcsr.com, www.shirtscan.com and www.TrackMyT.com.
Thursday, 16 December 2010 15:44

Antarctic Ice Melts Further as Warmer Water Rises

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For more than a century, much of Earth's warming was buried deep in oceans and a new study reveals it's starting to surface in Antarctica. Global sea temperatures are on the rise, but the largest increase has been measured in the frigid waters off the Western Antarctic Peninsula, according to a report presented at a recent meeting of the American Geophysical Union by physical oceanographer Doug Martinson. The warm water is raising air temperatures, melting glaciers and already impacting penguin colonies. Scientists have estimated that more than 90% of the warming from human-generated greenhouse gases would end up in the oceans. Through the process of upwelling, that heat is now reaching the surface and causing 87% of alpine glaciers in that region to retreat, taking with it the Adele penguins' feeding platform – not to mention threatening their ice-dwelling diet of Antarctic krill and silverfish. Scientists are particularly concerned about the Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers, located below the Antarctic Peninsula, which are thinning at a rate of 160 feet a year as warm waters eat away at their underside. "There's the potential that we're locked into long term sea level rise for a long time," Martinson told Discovery News. This finding makes finding solutions to reduce future greenhouse gas emissions even more important as we begin to feel the toll of past emissions.  Find out what you can do to mitigate further warming at Carbonfund.org.
Wednesday, 27 October 2010 16:33

America's Least Popular Vampire

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Dead and blood thirsty are all the rage in Hollywood, and America is more than willing to spend $10 a ticket to watch the gorefest (or smoochfest, depending on the vampire movie). But what if this vampire costs you around $100 a year and stalks your home? Vampire energy, AKA standby power, is the phenomenon where electronics suck energy even when they're turned off. By leaving gadgets like your computer, television or even electric toothbrush plugged into the wall, they're still leaching power and represent 5-10 percent of an average home's power usage, or 1 percent of our global carbon dioxide emissions, according to a GOOD Magazine report. The top power wasters in most homes are cell phones, digital cameras and music players, power tools and other electronic devices. Rather than anointing your laptop with garlic, the best way to avoid vampire energy is by using a power strip. All electronics can remain plugged in and when you turn them off and flip the power strip switch, you know they're really off. There's no reason not to get a power strip—saving on energy and on your utility bill is just practical. Check out Carbonfund.org partner Ecostrip's site for more information and purchasing options.
Tuesday, 10 March 2009 10:16

American GHG Registry in the Works?

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Today, the EPA proposed a plan that will account for and report Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG) for all major US emitters. The plan would cover up to 90% of all US based emissions and would serve as the basis for any proposed cap-and-trade emissions reductions system. As reported by the Washington Post:
"If adopted by the end of the year [2009], the new rule could produce greenhouse gas statistics by the end of 2010. The EPA requirements would apply to large industrial sources that emit 25,000 metric tons or more a year, including oil and chemical refineries; cement, glass, pulp and paper plants; manufacturers of motor vehicles and engines; and confined animal feeding operations."
Setting the bar for inclusion in this mandatory reporting at 25,000 metric tons means that virtually all small and medium sized businesses would not be required to report their emissions. Carbonfund.org, for example, estimates that many standard businesses with less than 20 employees are responsible for about 140 metric tons of CO2 a year. Businesses range in size and activity, but one can reasonably assume that most small and medium sized businesses not engaged in industrial practices would be under the reporting limit. A GHG reporting system is yet another step in the right direction for American action on global warming. By understanding our nation's carbon footprint, our government will be able to intelligently devise a cap-and-trade system that will produce real world emissions cuts. To better understand your carbon footprint or to estimate your business' GHG emissions, go to Carbonfund.org.
Monday, 13 September 2010 16:35

Insurance Industry Steps Up Action on Climate

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One of our newest partners, All American Bail Bonds, illustrates a growing trend in the insurance industry– taking care of the planet. Though not typically seen as large carbon emitters, the insurance industry is heavily weighed down with paperwork. If you haven’t taken out a homeowners or life insurance policy, you’ll be astounded at the number of copies of documents you’re required to sign and receive. My recent homeowners insurance policy ran almost 40 pages. Two weeks ago we wrote about the unfulfilled concept of the paperless office. Promisingly, more companies are signing up to reduce their environmental footprints and invest in carbon reduction projects. Joining Transamerica, Infiniti Insurance and others, All American Bail Bonds has taken steps to reduce and offset its carbon footprint. By instituting a comprehensive electronic data system, the company has reduced its paper usage by over half and converted all remaining printing to recycled paper. On a related note, more than 100 of the world’s top insurance companies recently issued a UN-backed call for governments to use risk management techniques and insurance know-how to help developing nations adapt to climate change. Read more here.
A new company called Earth Swag is introducing a line of reusable snack bags and sandwich wraps. There are few alternatives to small, plastic bags... until now. Earth Swag is releasing two new options: bags and wraps. The snack bags are a way to pack snacks to take for lunch, in the car or out for a hike. The sandwich wrap will keep a sandwich snug until lunch and then open into a placemat. Earth Swag reusable snack bags and sandwich wraps are made of a patented cotton that is both food-safe and bacteria-inhibiting. The fabric is also stain resistant, water-resistant and machine washable. The bags and wraps have no plastic coating or liner, and the fabric contains no phthalates, lead, PVC or polyurethane. Additionally, the fabric is printed with images of the Earth incorporated into various whimsical designs. Each baggy purchased has the potential to keep hundreds of plastic baggies out of our oceans, streams, and landfills each year. Earth Swag has also partnered with Carbonfund.org to offset their carbon footprint, and the business is committed to green practices. The product line includes: 1.    A set of 2 snack baggies ($15.99) 2.    A sandwich wrap that opens up to a place mat ($11.99) Both products are available in 2 prints: Bugs or Flowers. Earth Swag reusable snack bags and sandwich wraps provide people who are tired of plastic bags a safe and environmentally friendly way to pack their lunch or take snacks on the go.
usn1US News editor and Alpha Consumer blogger, Kimberly Palmer asked, Are Eco-Resorts Really Green? Initially skeptical, she wades through greenwash and finds real eco-friendly tourist destinations, among them Carbonfund.org partners. She mentions for example EcoTour Adventures in Jackson Hole, Wyoming and Craftsman B&B on the pacific coast of Oregon who are committed to sustainability. When evaluating the green claims of any business, you can look for these signs: 1. They express their environmental commitment on their website or materials; 2. They are transparent about what they have done to reduce what they can or offset what they can't; 3. If you need more info, the contact person is familiar with and clear about their business' efforts. Getting green is crucial for the tourism industry. As a reminder, check out this article from the BBC yesterday that reports that the Caribbean region is among the regions said by scientists to be most at risk from the effects of global warming. Coral reefs face collapse from global warming and dealing with extreme weather is expected to cost $5 billion. Add that to the expected loss of $4 billion in travel revenue, the vacation in the Carribean in many people's dreams might, if the world doesn't take action pass into legend. We all have a carbon footprint. Take responsibility for yours now. Learn more about how you can reduce and offset your footprint on our website.