Friday, 05 March 2010 11:03

The Oscars Lay Groundwork for More Eco-Friendly Event

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With the 82nd Annual Academy Awards just around the corner all eyes are on Oscar and top nominees from films around the world. But with the production of award shows come large carbon footprints; the 2008 Oscars had an estimated 630 metric tons of carbon emissions. However, recently the film industry has taken notice that being environmentally conscious is not a fleeting Hollywood fad, and in 2008 the Oscars began a green initiative. The 2008 eco-friendly efforts included red carpets made of old plastic bottles, chalkboards for signage, electric generators powered by soy waste biodiesel fuel, and party tents lit by solar panels. In 2009, the Academy Awards up the ante and partnered with Seventh Generation, a leading producer of recycled, non-toxic and eco-friendly cleaning supplies. Swag bags given to celebrity presenters also frequently include items such as low-energy light bulbs. Among gifts for some nominees this year include the world's first Carbonfund.org CarbonFree® Certified paper shredder, the GoECOlife™ SOHO 8-Sheet ULTRA-QUIET™ Paper Shredder, which underwent a rigorous, third-party product life-cycle assessment to determine its carbon footprint. In addition to using energy-saving technology, GoECOlife™ reduced the remaining carbon footprint through support of Carbonfund.org’s renewable energy, energy efficiency and reforestation carbon reduction projects. While it's to be seen how the event itself will build upon its efforts to be more eco-friendly, the Oscars can refer to many examples of how large events have reduced their carbon footprint. For example, another Los Angeles event coming up is the Cable Show 2010, which will take place in May at the LA Convention Center. The Cable Show is offsetting the emissions from employee travel, hotel stays, meals and the LA Convention Center in support of Carbonfund.org’s third-party validated carbon reduction projects, including the New York State Landfill Methane Project.
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