Tuesday, 20 September 2011 13:49

Social Venture Network Offsets Global Warming Pollution

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San Francisco, CA. April 4, 2006 - The Social Venture Network (SVN), a network of business leaders committed to building a just and sustainable world, plans to make its annual member gathering carbon neutral with Carbonfund.org, as a practical step to combat global warming. “We’re very pleased to partner with Carbonfund.org to offset the carbon emission impact of our conference and help take action against climate change,” said Deborah Nelson, co-executive director of SVN.” This year’s annual meeting, being held in Kennebunkport, Maine April 20 through 23, will focus on the power of connection and innovation. Among the noted speakers will be Steve Case, CEO of Revolution and former CEO and Chairman of AOL, and Gloria Steinem, co-founder of Ms. Magazine.

With some 250 people attending and traveling to Kennebunkport, the event will produce carbon emissions caused by air travel, ground transportation, and the use of facilities in the hotel. Carbonfund.org and SVN will offset the carbon dioxide emissions by supporting renewable energy, energy efficiency projects, and reforestation projects that reduce an equal amount of emissions. SVN is committed to accounting for its carbon expenditures.

“Social Venture Network is taking an excellent and practical step by offsetting their emissions from this conference with Carbonfund.org,” says Lesley Marcus Carlson, President of Carbonfund.org. “We are extremely pleased that such a fantastic group of business leaders are taking this step, and we hope that the rest of the business community is not far behind.”

Carbonfund.org is a non-profit organization whose goal is to make carbon offsets and climate protection easy, affordable and a normal way of life for every individual and business. Carbon offsets - also called renewable energy certificates and ‘green tags’ – enable individuals and businesses to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in one location, where it is cost effective, to offset the emissions they are responsible for in their normal activities, like home, office, driving or air travel emissions. For instance, a clean, zero COwind farm can offset the carbon dioxide produced by a coal-fired power plant that powers a home. Social Venture Network, via Carbonfund.org, is supporting wind and energy efficiency projects that subsidize the cost of clean, renewable energy that also helps further the technology.

The average American is directly responsible for about 10 tons of carbon dioxide annually through their home, car and air travel, and their average total annual impact rises to an average of 24 tons when factoring in the purchase of goods and services. Conferences, with the heavy reliance on air travel and other transportation, are an easy first step for any organization that wants to offset their carbon emissions. Because conferences also bring decision makers together, for Carbonfund.org, it is an excellent opportunity to educate and demonstrate that being responsible is both simple and environmentally effective.

About Social Venture Network
Founded in 1987 by some of the nation’s most visionary leaders in socially responsible business, SVN (http://www.svn.org) is a non-profit network of leaders committed to building a just and sustainable world through business. SVN promotes new models of leadership for socially and environmentally sustainable business through its network of nearly 400 business owners, investors and nonprofit executives.

About Carbonfund.org
Carbonfund.org reduces the threat of climate change by making it easy and affordable for any individual or business to reduce their carbon footprint and support climate-friendly projects. With its easy-to-use calculator, low offset cost per ton of CO2, and certified offset projects, Carbonfund.org is proving that anyone can reduce their impact on climate change easily and efficiently.  Carbonfund.org is a 501(c)(3) charitable, nonprofit organization, and a member of the EPA’s Green Power Network, the Chicago Climate Exchange and Ceres.

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