Tuesday, 01 September 2009 17:36

Eat Green with Metropolitan Food Service

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MFS LogoMetropolitan Food Service is a family owned and operated food service management company based in Long Island, NY.  They provide Colleges and Universities in the local area with customized dining, vending, and catering services that meet their needs.  Their goal is to inspire and fuel the minds of their customers with fresh, nutritious, creative meals with a focus on convenience, affordability, and sustainability.  As a CarbonFree Partner, MFS offsets its corporate footprint in addition to implementing a wide range of environmental initiatives including:
  • Local, vegan, and organic snack items for the On the Go Healthy Vending Program
  • Local produce and meat
  • Biodegradable and sustainable packaging
  • Recycling of their waste cooking oil
  • Reduced bottled water use
  • Sustainable cleaning products and methodologies.
Additionally, any food that is not purchased is donated. If you're a college student, professor, or administrator in the New York area, who's supplying your dining hall food?  Consider making the switch to Metropolitan Food Service for locally produced food from an environmentally conscious company.
Tuesday, 01 September 2009 15:06

Coloradans Recognized for Work on Renewable Energy

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The Colorado Renewable Energy Society (CRES) awarded its 2009 Larson-Notari Award for distinguished service and contributions to the field of renewable energy and its 2008 Volunteer of the Year Award. CRES, based in Golden, Colo., is a nonprofit organization working to increase awareness of the economic and environmental benefits of renewables and energy efficiency. logoWinner of the Larson-Notari Award is Carol Tombari, Manager of Stakeholder Relations at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. At NREL, she works on electric utility and economic development issues. Prior to this, she was president of Mountain Energy Consultation, specializing in pubilc policy and programs on renewables, efficiency and the environmental impact of energy use. She has also led three delegations of state energy officials to China to discuss policies to facilitate the development of renewable energy and energy efficiency. CRES' 2008 Volunteer of the Year is Jerry Stevenson, Co-Chair of CRES' 2008 Colorado Renewable Energy Conference. Stevenson was recognized for his energy and dedication to the event; he volunteered while working as an engineer for the US Forest Service. The next Colorado Renewable Energy Conference is slated for June 18-20, 2010 in Montrose, Colo.
elem1The Fulton Elementary School Parent-Teacher Association (PTA) is the first CarbonFree® Green PTA in America. “We are very proud to join CarbonFree® Partner companies and organizations like Discovery Communications, Avis, Amtrak, 41pounds.org and others to help the environment, support energy independence, and help make the transition to a clean energy future possible,” states Fulton PTA President Brian Meshkin. “It is our hope that we will teach our kids and lead by example to encourage progress from the grassroots.” As a CarbonFree® Green PTA, Fulton offset its carbon footprint with a donation to Carbonfund.org, which calculated the carbon emissions from the building usage and attendee transportation to meetings and activities for the 2009-10 school year. Fulton’s donation supports Carbonfund.org’s third-party validated carbon offset projects in renewable energy, energy efficiency, and reforestation which are reducing global warming emissions today. The PTA will also hold a fundraiser where members and friends can make their homes and cars CarbonFree® with 20 percent of the tax-deductible donations supporting the PTA’s environmental initiatives. Additionally, the Fulton Elementary PTA is reducing its paper and ink consumption by 50 percent, supporting its Environmental Committee’s Chesapeake Bay Day assembly and the school’s soil conservation garden at Fulton Elementary as multi-disciplinary learning experiences, and embarking on other environmental initiatives. The Green PTA Program involves: • Becoming a CarbonFree® PTA Partner by reducing, offsetting the carbon footprint of a PTA’s activities • Reducing paper and fossil fuel-based ink consumption through increased use of electronic mediums • Establishing an environmental or wellness PTA committee that promotes more environmentally conscious choices by families such as carpooling • Completing a Green School certification application in the PTA’s state (if available) • Incorporating environmental protection initiatives in PTA projects “With the great families, teachers and administrators at Fulton Elementary, we are pleased to lead the way and plant a seed here that will hopefully grow and flourish as other PTA’s join us,” said Meshkin.
Tuesday, 01 September 2009 09:42

Be a Carbonfund.org Social Media Volunteer!

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social mediaEducation is central to Carbonfund.org's mission. As a part of that, we push for strong standards in the carbon offset industry so consumers know what to look for when they offset their carbon footprint. There's a lot of misinformation on offsets in social media. If you think you'd like to help set the record straight about offsets, email Susanna at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Sign up and we will:
  • Host an online training session on social media tools
  • Invite you to an email listserv where we can share articles, techniques, contacts, etc.
  • Provide you with ongoing support and material to help you find your voice online
This is a unique volunteer opportunity in that you don't have to show up at a place or time to help out. You can do this from home or on the go. Send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to help.
Doyle Rice of USA Today reported that the Midwest will see the most temperature rise within decades from global warming. This according to analysis by The Nature Conservancy and two US universities of UN climate data. If greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions continue rising at their current rate, within the next 40 years avg. temperatures are expected to be five degrees higher across much of the US, with the greatest increases in Illinois, Iowa, Missouri and Wisconsin.
farming"The surprise was that the biggest changes were in the Heartland and the Great Plains," said Jonathan Hoekstra, director of the climate change program at The Nature Conservancy. So far, he said the western US has been the area that has seen the most warming.
"In many states across the country, the weather and landscapes could be nearly unrecognizable in 100 years," he added. By 2100, states such as Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa and South Dakota could see average temperature increases of more than 10 degrees.
The analysis was based on data from the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and was produced in conjunction with the University of Washington and the University of Southern Mississippi.
Some impacts Midwesterners could see by 2100 include significant declines in the dairy industry because dairy cow productivity decreases above 77°F.  Also, the US' $200 billion agriculture industry would face drier soil and shifting crop production patterns.
Friday, 28 August 2009 16:17

LA Lawmakers Giving Cash for Grass

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lawn freeLos Angeles just launched a new program that is aimed at reducing water use. Their innovative approach gives a $1 rebate for every square foot of turf to people who replace their lawns with drought tolerant groundcovers or native plants that require a maximum of 15” of water per square foot per year. The program has already been implemented in Las Vegas where officials estimate they will save 7 billion gallons of water per year. I love this plan. There’s nothing more boring than a lawn, and if you’re unfortunate enough to have to care for one, you know how annoying it is to mow it. They also dirty up our water system with all the herbicides, insecticides, and fertilizers people use to keep them pretty. And, according to the US EPA, gas mowers represent 5% of US air pollution and use 800 million gallons of gas per year. And, if you’ve ever been to the LA area, you know that’s not a place where lawns are supposed to grow. It’s hot and dry; all you should really see is chaparral and other drought-tolerant plants. From Sustainablegardeningblog.com:
With very few exceptions, California’s residential and commercial lawns are all “exotics”, coming from outside of North America. These turfs include Tall Fescue (Europe), Blue Grass (Europe), Bermuda Grass (Africa), Zoysia (Philippines), Seashore Paspalum (tropical Americas), and St. Augustine (West Indies, West Africa). All of these grasses come from areas with much higher rainfall than California. Of these, tall fescue is our most common landscape turfgrass state-wide, and this grass type is also one of the most water-requiring, using upwards of 40” to 50” of water per square foot per year.
But should we all just get rid of our lawns? Maybe not. Lawns still provide an essential filtration service, cleaning rain water before it empties into reservoirs and groundwater sources. They also mitigate that hot summer heat generated by city streets and buildings. And there are still those suburbs that need their white picket fences and impeccably cut lawns. Certainly, some regions can easily grow grass without using enormous amounts of water and chemicals. Sustainablegardeningblog.com recommends using water-friendly turf, such as a native Carex or buffalograss. Researchers at UC Davis and Riverside have developed a type of buffalograss called ‘UC Verde’ that has been shown to get by on just 12” of water per year, resulting in 75% water savings over regular lawns. Check out the section on Lawn Reduction and Lawn Substitutes and The Great American Delawning Movement from Sustainable-gardening.com to read about how to create a lawn-free yard. Or if you have to keep your lawn, use a sustainable lawn maintenance company like Clean Air Lawn Care.
Last Friday, Kathie Lee and Hoda discussed personalized wine on their MSNBC show Kathie Lee & Hoda.  Showcasing numerous festive wines including Cabernet and Pinot Grigio, the talk show hosts describe the customized labels that each bottle of wine can offer.  The wine company is none other than Stoney Creek Wine Press, a proud CarbonFree shipping partner!  For over a year, Stoney Creek Wine Press has been offsetting all of the shipping emissions associated with shipping their wine to their customers.  Check out Stoney Creek Wine Press to get your own personalized wine today and view the video below!
Thursday, 27 August 2009 16:58

Camping: Your Low Carbon Vacation

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georgian bay at sunsetLife is hard and filled with technology, people and all sorts of things that seem to all too often stress me out. That is why when I take a vacation the best thing for me, if I want to relax, is to get as far away from everything as possible. Camping is a great way to recharge your battery, vacation on the cheap, experience nature, and maintain a small carbon footprint. My favorite camping trip to date was when I piled some supplies in a canoe and paddled aimlessly through the Georgian Bay, looking for the perfect island to camp on. The waters were clear (and cold!) and the weather was perfect. All I needed on that trip to make me happy was some easy to make food, a cheap bottle of wine and some pieces of driftwood to make a fire. My carbon footprint was small, but my satisfaction was great. When traveling, much of your carbon footprint comes from getting you to and from your destination. So when picking your camping location, consider some place close enough to drive. Sites like trails.com provide a quick reference for camping locations near where you live. Also, consider supporting Carbonfund.org's CarbonFree® Partners, like Mountain Plus, when looking to gear up for your trip. Also, where ever you may roam, offset the car or flight emissions that got you there. This Labor Day, if you are looking for a real break from life, pack a tent and some food and make a b-line for the wilderness. Camping keeps your carbon footprint small, won't break the budget and it might be exactly what you need to recharge your battery.