Jordana Fyne

Jordana Fyne

Carbonfund.org is proud to announce the launch of Ecosearch.co, a free online search service that enables anyone to help protect the environment simply through their everyday web searches. Ecosearch.co generates revenue from Google, which it uses to support international reforestation projects. One year from now, Carbonfund.org hopes to have planted three million trees through Ecosearch.co, or about 8,000 trees every day. To celebrate the launch and jumpstart their goal, Carbonfund.org will plant two trees for the first 250,000 new users who set Ecosearch.co as their computer’s default search engine and Like it on Facebook (www.facebook.com/ecosearch.co). “You can set Ecosearch.co as your default search engine and forget about it because you’re receiving the same great results,” said Eric Carlson, president of Carbonfund.org. “It’s one easy, free way to make a difference that anyone can do today.” Ecosearch.co chose to support reforestation projects because of the scope of their environmental and social benefits. Tree planting absorbs carbon dioxide to reduce climate change, improves air quality, preserves biodiversity, controls flooding by minimizing runoff and topsoil loss, provides habitat and nutrition for wildlife, and creates jobs managing tree nurseries, planting and care. “The devastation caused by mass deforestation is one of the most critical environmental problems facing our world and people today,” added Carlson. “We must develop simple and effective ways to reduce deforestation and ultimately turn the tide by reforesting crucial land around the world. Ecosearch.co aims to do just that.” Funds earned from ad revenue support projects like the Haiti Reforestation Initiative, which plants trees throughout Haiti, particularly the municipalities most impacted by the devastating earthquake in 2010. There local organizations work with communities to bring fresh life to the region via trees and jobs.

Tuesday, 19 April 2011 14:05

This Earth Day Make Love, Not Carbon

Standard Innovation Corporation, the company behind the We-Vibe – the fastest-selling sexual health product of its type in history, announced a charitable campaign to combat global warming this Earth Day, April 22. The company will donate $5 to Carbonfund.org for every new person who follows @Ms_WeVibe on Twitter or likes the We-Vibe Facebook page between now and April 22 to report that eco-friendly sex is important to them. “It's our way of offsetting the carbon generated from all that extra heavy breathing – and then some,” jokes Danny Osadca, We-Vibe company CEO. “We have always been a carbon-neutral provider of body-safe and eco-friendly products and this is an extra tip of our hat to Mother Nature.” What Exactly is Greener Sex Anyway? Here are five tips on how to be eco-sexier: 1.        Surprise your partner with an environmentally-friendly intimate gift. Look for rechargeable sexual wellbeing products that are made of body-safe and eco-friendly materials, and comply with the world's most stringent standards, including RoHS, WEEE, and REACH. 2.        Rub down with homemade eco-massage oil. Check out Stefanie Iris Weiss’ critically acclaimed enviro-sexual bible, Eco Sex, to find recipes to brew up homemade oils from natural materials. 3.        Read the labels and do your homework, says Certified Sex Educator Lou Paget. It's your body not a manufacturer's test site; know the source and composition of anything you are using on or in your body. 4.        Good clean oxygen is at the heart of sexual arousal and the better you breathe, the better your sex life, according to sex therapist and best-selling author Ian Kerner. Put an air-purifier in your bedroom. Many people suffer from allergies which really impairs their libido and interest in sex. A good air purifier will remove dust and other allergens and increase air-flow. 5.        Find someone who is as passionate about the environment as they are about getting it on. Eco-friendly dating sites, like Ecodater.com and Greensingles.com, are a great way to meet your eco-warrior partner. How to Show Your Support To choose LOVE not CARBON, simply follow Twitter @Ms_WeVibe or like the We-Vibe Facebook page between now and April 22 and $5 will be donated in your honor to Carbonfund.org. Share your ideas for “greening up the bedroom” on the We-Vibe Blog and we’ll send you a free We-Vibe product if your suggestion is selected for our next list.
Tuesday, 15 February 2011 16:00

How Cool is Your Roof?

When it comes to roofing, sure it's hip to be "weatherproof " and "sans leaks," but if you want your roof to be really cool then you need to consider the hue. PPG Industries launched an online tool that helps architects and building owners select the best cool roof coating color based on reflectance. A highly reflective paint job means more of the sun's rays are bouncing off the house, keeping it cooler and requiring less air conditioning. By cranking down the A/C, you're reducing the amount of energy your house is consuming while also shrinking your utility bill. Pretty neat. Many of the colors in the Cool Colors Database have even been many registered with ENERGY STAR or the Cool Roof Rating Council, which is an EPA-recognized certification body for the ENERGY STAR program. “We understand how difficult it is for architects and specifiers to sort through manufacturers’ catalogs and industry listings to find the right colors and products for their projects,” said Scott Moffatt, PGG’s director of marketing for coil and extrusion coatings. “This tool enables them to expand the search process and accelerate it at the same time.” Tres cool.
For anyone who's ever bought an item sealed in plastic clamshell packaging, it's no secret how difficult it is to open. The shocker is that some manufacturers are finally heeding our frustration and ditching the clamshell -- not just because it's annoying but largely due to the significant cost savings and reduction in environmental impact. When electronic toothbrush manufacturer Philips switched to recycled-cardboard packaging, plastic mass was reduced from 60g to 2g, shipping became "much less expensive," and the company saw a 60% improvement in approval ratings. This is just one trend highlighting the shift in private business to rework products to be more sustainable, as reported in the Consumer Electronics Association 2010 Sustainability Report. The document showcases the best in business when it comes to consumer electronics practices and offers case studies from manufacturers and retailers that focus on energy use, packaging, e-waste and other environmental issues the industry needs to tackle. The report holds up the CarbonFree® Certified Motorola CITRUS™ smartphone as an example of sustainable product design. The CITRUS features a housing made from 25% post-consumer recycled plastic, which saves 20% of the energy needed to make the phone housing when compared with standard plastic. It also results in less landfill waste and encourages more recycling by creating a market for used materials. Positive environmental impacts measured in the report include:
  • U.S. sales of EPEAT-certified desktops, laptops, and displays grew nearly 10 percent in 2009, to a total of 48.5 million units.
  • Currently, more than 27,000 consumer electronic product models meet ENERGY STAR specifications set by the EPA and Department of Energy.
  • In 2009, CEA estimated that the electronics recycling efforts of manufacturers and retailers in the U.S. diverted more than 200 million pounds of electronics from landfills.
  • In 2009, the 10 largest CE companies by global revenue donated $882 million, in both cash and products, to support activities that enhance local environments, social well-being, and/or economic development.
The growing commonality of sustainable practices in business is an undeniable win for the environment but, as Greenbiz.com editor Matthew Wheeland explains, "These changes -- which are taking place across the electronics industry -- are not happening because of their environmental benefits, but because of the business benefits. And that makes the green improvements even more likely to continue."
[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="384" caption="Image courtesy of Solar Thermal Magazine"][/caption] A record-breaking $243 billion was spent globally on clean energy investment in 2010, which represents a 30% increase from 2009 and double the amount spent in 2006, according to a Bloomberg New Energy Finance report released yesterday. Wind and solar power, as well as energy-smart technologies like electric vehicles and power storage, all saw a boost in investment dollars, which Michael Liebreich, chief executive of Bloomberg New Energy Finance, lauds as a huge achievement. "It flies in the face of scepticism about the clean energy sector among public market investors, who have been concerned about the sustainability of subsidy programs in Europe, the failure of the Obama administration to deliver a climate or an energy deal, and the crescendo of ill?informed doubts about climate change," Liebreich said. China and Europe were the main drivers in last year's clean energy push with investment in China up 30% to $51.1 billion, by far the largest figure for any country. Small-scale generation projects like rooftop solar panels surged by 91% in 2010 to $59.6 billion, largely in Germany but also in the U.S., Czech Republic, Italy and elsewhere. “We have been saying for some time that the world needs to reach a figure of $500 billion per annum investment in clean energy if we are to see carbon emissions peak by 2020," Liebreich said. "What we are seeing in these figures for the first time is that we are half?way there, and it is very good news." While this surge in clean energy investment is positive, Liebreich does point out that 2010's growth was spurred by government intervention, particularly in China and Europe. He suggests that the industry needs to continue to drive down costs to reduce reliance on this type of support so that the global community can eventually thrive on these alternative energy solutions. Find out how you can hasten the transition to a clean energy future by learning more about Carbonfund.org's renewable energy, energy efficiency and reforestation projects.
[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="347" caption="UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon addresses COP16 in Cancun, Mexico. "][/caption] The two-week United Nations climate summit in Cancun (COP16) wrapped up with a plan of action that promised aid for developing countries, technology transfer and the protection of more forests. But the summit was largely a failure and missed opportunity for not seeking greater accountability from countries to reduce emissions or agreeing on a more comprehensive set of solutions to climate change. Carbonfund.org has called upon countries to take action, at a minimum by extending the term of the Kyoto Protocol or by taking steps to build on the progress of Kyoto and the voluntary carbon markets. There are enough potential carbon buyers in the European Union, Japan, Australia and Canada and enough potential carbon sellers in China, India, Indonesia and Brazil to create a robust carbon reduction pact. “We have the technical capability and market readiness to transform our global economy to one where clean energy costs less than dirty energy and efficient technology costs less than inefficient technology,” said Carbonfund.org President Eric Carlson. The "Cancun Agreement" received near unanimous support from member states except Bolivia, which stood alone in condemning the document as too weak in its emissions targets and its accountability of industrialized nations. Mexican Foreign Minister Patricia Espinosa, who presided over the conference, overruled Bolivia's dissent and declared the agreement official, stating "consensus doesn't mean unanimity." Wrangling nearly 200 nations into agreement was viewed as some progress, considering the initial opposition of carbon-emitting powerhouses United States and China. Among China's concerns was that foreign states might find themselves privy to sensitive national data. A compromise on monitoring meant that countries that fund climate mitigation can report their own progress, and nations receiving international support to fund their efforts will be subject to verification through biennial international consultations. American climate envoy Todd Stern told Reuters that China's willingness to take on an emissions commitment and to do so in a transparent manner helps ease concerns in the US about what rapidly developing countries are doing to fight climate change. Meanwhile, the US faces tough odds of meeting its Copenhagen pledge of a 17 percent cut in emissions by 2020 given a divided Congress and continued uncertainty over the steps that EPA will take to regulate emissions. The Cancun Agreement itself is more an action plan than an executable solution. The three main areas outlined in the agreement are: • Green Climate Fund. Rich nations will deliver $30 billion by 2012 to poor countries and follow that up with an annual transfer of $100 billion by 2020 for cleaner energy and to help them adapt to climate change impacts such as drought and sea level rise. The exact source of the funds is undefined. • Forest protection. Financial mechanisms were developed to prevent clear-cutting of tropical forests that serve to store carbon from the atmosphere. Details of how forests will be monitored are to be determined. • Technology Executive Committee. The group will set up rules to transfer clean energy technologies to poor nations. The problem with this plan is it comes much too late, doesn’t go far enough to make a big dent on climate change, and lacks teeth. The international community walked away from Cancun without creating a system to enforce these points, track the dollars or measure progress. Thus it will continue to fall primarily on non-governmental actors including individuals and businesses to fight climate change. The UN’s next step will be moving to action on these points by the next climate summit in Durban, South Africa beginning in November 2011. Also on the table in South Africa is the fate of the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, set to expire 2012. The agreement, which included the European Union and industrialized nations but not the US, set reduction standards for greenhouse gas emissions. Renewal is uncertain as Japan and Russia are presently refusing to sign the protocol unless China and India are included.

Envirosearch.org Uses Bing Search, Ad Revenue Supports Environmental Projects

Carbonfund.org is proud to announce today's launch of Envirosearch.org, a free online search service that enables anyone to help protect the environment simply through their everyday web searches. Envirosearch.org, which is powered by Bing and generates revenue from Yahoo! ads, supports international conservation projects like reforestation efforts and wildlife preservation. Envirosearch.org is a groundbreaking collaboration of environmental organizations addressing conservation on both a global and local level. Through the combined efforts of Carbonfund.org, Environmental Defense Fund, National Wildlife Federation, and Environmental Media Association, the site will support meaningful conservation initiatives. Envirosearch.org will initially support tree-planting programs in Haiti, India and the United States, along with the important programs of its conservation partners. “Envirosearch.org proves once again that protecting our environment and doing the things we enjoy and need to do can go hand in hand,” said Eric Carlson, president of Carbonfund.org. “If there is just one simple thing everyone can do today to help our environment, making the switch to Envirosearch.org is it.” Deforestation is a critical global issue, accounting for about twenty percent of greenhouse gas emissions globally as well as the destruction of habitats, soil erosion, loss of economic opportunities, and degradation of water quality. Envirosearch.org supports global reforestation efforts and will also sponsor clean energy and other important environmental programs. Envirosearch.org is powered by Bing with sponsored ads through Yahoo!, which means it provides the same great results as the Microsoft-based search engine and offers ads relevant to the search. Envirosearch.org is a free service to the user.

Carbonfund.org is calling for the US to stay home from the UN climate negotiations in Cancun, which would give participating countries the ability to extend the term of the Kyoto Protocol or agree on a new emissions reduction treaty. Eric Carlson, president of Carbonfund.org, said, "The US has been the 800-pound gorilla in the room at climate negotiations. As the largest global emitter per capita with enormous entourages at the meetings, all attention goes toward the US. Put simply, the problem is that there are not 67 votes in the US Senate to ratify any climate deal the President might negotiate. It's like Lucy pulling the football away from Charlie Brown. The world needs to wise up and move the ball to a different field." Climate change is a global problem that requires an international effort to solve. Carbonfund.org is calling on countries to take action, at a minimum by extending the term of the Kyoto Protocol or by taking steps to build on the progress of the protocol and the voluntary carbon markets. "There are enough potential carbon buyers in the European Union, Japan, Australia and Canada and enough potential carbon sellers in China, India, Indonesia and Brazil to create a robust carbon reduction pact," said Carlson. Nearly a hundred other smaller countries could also sign onto a global pact. "We have the technical capability and market readiness to transform our global economy to one where clean energy costs less than dirty energy and efficient technology costs less than inefficient technology," added Carlson. "That is the goal."
Here are some gift suggestions from our rigorous CarbonFree® Product Certification Program for products that have reduced their carbon footprint and have earned the CarbonFree® product label. For the coffee lover: Perk up their morning with a new brew and a new way of consuming coffee. Grounds for Change Coffee gracefully straddles the line between producing a quality product and engaging in socially, financially and environmentally responsible business practices. For the electronics lover: The latest gadget may already be sitting under the tree. Why not stuff their stocking this year with CarbonFree® Certified batteries. Eco Alkalines are certified carbon neutral and they're made without Cadmium, Lead, or Mercury. For the chef: Honey is a great ingredient for everything from apricot glazed chicken to baklava. The gourmand in your life will truly appreciate this pantry staple from Royal Hawaiian Honey. For the teenager: They’re too cool for a hand-knit Christmas sweater, so might as well get them a hoody they’ll actually wear. Anvil Knitwear, Inc., a socially and environmentally responsible manufacturer of sportswear and accessories, is a leader in the sustainable apparel industry with its AnvilOrganic®, AnvilRecycled™ and AnvilSustainable™ brands. For the cell phone enthusiast: When it comes to technology, some people revel in having the newest product on the market. It seems like everyone has a smartphone these days, but the Motorola CITRUS™ is the first in its class when it comes to “green tech,” with the phone’s housing made from 25% post-consumer recycled plastic, the packaging made from 80% post-consumer recycled paper, and Motorola balancing the carbon dioxide required to manufacture, distribute and operate the phone in support of third-party validated renewable energy and reforestation projects.
For more than a century, much of Earth's warming was buried deep in oceans and a new study reveals it's starting to surface in Antarctica. Global sea temperatures are on the rise, but the largest increase has been measured in the frigid waters off the Western Antarctic Peninsula, according to a report presented at a recent meeting of the American Geophysical Union by physical oceanographer Doug Martinson. The warm water is raising air temperatures, melting glaciers and already impacting penguin colonies. Scientists have estimated that more than 90% of the warming from human-generated greenhouse gases would end up in the oceans. Through the process of upwelling, that heat is now reaching the surface and causing 87% of alpine glaciers in that region to retreat, taking with it the Adele penguins' feeding platform – not to mention threatening their ice-dwelling diet of Antarctic krill and silverfish. Scientists are particularly concerned about the Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers, located below the Antarctic Peninsula, which are thinning at a rate of 160 feet a year as warm waters eat away at their underside. "There's the potential that we're locked into long term sea level rise for a long time," Martinson told Discovery News. This finding makes finding solutions to reduce future greenhouse gas emissions even more important as we begin to feel the toll of past emissions.  Find out what you can do to mitigate further warming at Carbonfund.org.
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