Maia Davis

Maia Davis

Wal-Mart, the nation's largest retailer, has asked their over 100,000 suppliers to reduce 20 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions by the end of 2015--the emissions reductions are equivalent to removing some 3.8 million cars from the road for one year. Wal-Mart plans to meet their goal by focusing on the products with some of the highest carbon footprints, like milk and meat products. Like many retail stores, most of the carbon emissions that Wal-Mart is responsbile for are not generated within the four walls of their stores: they orgininate from the manufaturing and shipping of the products, long before they reach Wal-Mart's shelves. By requiring emissions reductions from their suppliers, Wal-Mart is tackling the biggest component of their carbon footprint. Wal-Mart is working with those suppliers to reduce emissions and will jointly account for the reductions. This means that suppliers need to assess and track emissions accurately, reliably and verifiablly. To ensure methodology, completeness and correct calculations of emissions assessments quality assurance checks will be performed at all levels of the supply chain. To learn how Carbonfund.org can help your business manage and reduce the carbon emissions associated with your products, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. today.
In January 2010, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) voted to provide public companies with interpretive guidance on existing SEC disclosure requirements as they relate to climate change. Risks associated with climate change may trigger disclosure requirements for:
  • Impact of legislation and regulation
  • Impact of international accords
  • Indirect consequences of regulation or business trends
  • Physical impacts of climate change
In order for companies to fulfill their reportinging requirements they must be able to identify their carbon impact and how a changing climate may impact their business. Carbonfund.org provides many carbon management services for businesses to help the quantify their carbon footprint and actively manage their impact. Stay ahead of this requirement: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. today to learn more about your the carbon footprint of your business.
The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires 31 industries, which cover 85 percent of the total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, to track and report their emissions beginning in 2010 through the Greenhouse Gas Mandatory Reporting Rule. “Gathering this information is the first step toward reducing greenhouse emissions and fostering innovative technologies for the clean energy future,” said EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson. In March, the U.S. EPA announced they are expanding the scope of their GHG mandatory reporting rule to include more of the oil and natural gas sector, large fluorinated gases emitting sources and carbon sequestration. These sources would be required to track their emissions beginning in 2011. Public comment is currently open on this proposed rule expansion and the EPA will be holding web-based training and Q&A sessions. Unsure whether your business is required to disclose its greenhouse gas emissions? This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to learn more about your carbon footprint and to implement a plan to quantify and reduce it.
ind1The US EPA requires 31 industries to track and report their emissions beginning in 2010 through the Greenhouse Gas Mandatory Reporting Rule finalized on October 30, 2009. EPA recently announced that they are expanding the scope of their GHG mandatory reporting rule to include more of the oil and natural gas sector, large fluorinated gas emitting sources and carbon sequestration. These sources would be required to track their emissions beginning in 2011. Public comment is currently open on this proposed rule expansion. The mandatory reporting is separate from EPA regulations announced yesterday on reducing carbon emissions. The regulations announced yesterday could be enforced in the event Congress does not pass a climate bill.