collegeRide a bike. Biking or walking is the best way to save on gas and save on money. Plus if you have a bike, you could do bike delivery. Check out this awesome business model: harvestcycle.com. They pick up produce from a local farm and deliver it carbon-free to their clients. Return your beverage bottles. Some states require stores and other distributors to give you a refund of 5-10 cents for every beverage or beer bottle you bring back. Plus, it’s green and gets the whole house to participate. Learn more here: www.bottlebill.org. Eliminate your vampire leakage. If you are paying the electricity bill, start off right by buying power strips that you can easily turn off when you’re not using the microwave, the TV and other appliances. A friend of mine was able to lower her electric bill to $7 a month this way! Stop the red cup madness! Start off right and buy a reusable party cup and get all your friends to do the same. If you have a party, let everyone know that they have to bring their own cup—you’ll eliminate waste AND clean-up time. Offset your events, and your carbon footprint. Calculate and offset in support of innovative projects to reduce carbon emissions, while reducing your own impact on the planet. You can calculate at the Carbonfund.org individual calculators here. Get involved in your campus climate group. Hundreds of college campuses have pledged to go carbon neutral because of activism by students. Find out at AASHE which campuses have pledged, and ask your own campus to do its part. Colleges and universities are helping to lead the way in the fight on global warming. Students are inventing clean energy technologies, designing the efficient green buildings, and pushing state and local policy. Get involved in the growing movement of young people who are helping to avert climate change today. Also check out the International Youth Climate Blog at itsgettinghotinhere.org.
Carbonfund.org announced the launch of the first EPA Climate Leaders approved carbon offset project with Casella Waste Systems, Inc.’s Clinton County Landfill Methane Project. Carbonfund.org is now offering offsets from the project to businesses and individuals at www.carbonfund.org/climateleaders. savedThe project, located near Plattsburgh, NY, is a landfill methane collection and destruction system. Recent improvements to the project have added a gas-to-energy plant producing approximately 5 megawatts of clean energy that can supply the electricity needs of 5,000 households. Casella, a charter member of the EPA Climate Leaders program and the only solid waste and resource management company in the program, developed the project. “We are excited to support the first-ever EPA Climate Leaders approved carbon offset project,” said Eric Carlson, president of Carbonfund.org. “Climate change affects every one of us, and we all must be part of the solution. Projects like Clinton County are reducing emissions today and hastening our transition to a low-carbon future.” The Clinton County Landfill Methane Project is located at a 70-acre facility permitted to accept 175,000 tons of solid waste per year. At the site, decomposing organic material such as paper and food produce landfill gas, a portion of which is methane. Methane is a greenhouse gas that is about 23 times more potent than carbon dioxide. By combusting the gas, the project keeps the methane out of the atmosphere, thereby dramatically reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The offsets currently available through Carbonfund.org represent methane destruction that occurred between January and September 2008. It is estimated that over 100,000 metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions were avoided in the period, equivalent to the greenhouse gas emissions from over 18,300 passenger vehicles. The EPA Climate Leaders program is a partnership between industry and government that works with companies to develop climate change strategies. Partner companies commit to reducing their impact on the global environment by completing a corporate-wide inventory of their greenhouse gas emissions based on a quality management system, setting reduction goals, and annually reporting progress on emissions reductions to EPA. Visit www.carbonfund.org/climateleaders.
Carbonfund.org CarbonFree® Partner Loisos + Ubbelohde is an architecture and building firm specializing in high performance buildings, architecture design, consulting, and planning. They focus on energy efficiency and sustainability.  Loisos + Ubbelohde believes architecture should provide a place to live comfortably and with an awareness of the environment in buildings that are generous in spirit and space.  Living spaces should be designed for people's well-being and made lovingly with high quality materials. L+ULoisos + Ubbelohde seeks a quadruple bottom line in running their business: fiscal, aesthetic, social, and environmental sustainability.  By using simulation and analysis techniques, they are able to address daylighting and lighting design, energy modeling, comfort analysis, building performance, and LEED certification.  In addition to offsetting their carbon footprint, their employees "Reduce What They Can" by bicycling and taking public transportation to the office and they are a certified Bay Area Green Business. The Loisos + Ubbelohde office employs lighting with occupancy sensors, increased insulation, and ceiling fans to help regulate temperature. To learn more about Loisos + Ubbelohde's environmental commitment or their passion for sustainable architecture, visit their website.
SeedFive experts including Eric Carlson are featured in the current Seed Magazine on the value of carbon offsets to reduce global carbon emissions. Third-party standards, verification and auditing are the hallmarks of real and high-quality offsets. The key question about a carbon offset is: Is it real, and who says so? Carbon offset providers should offer, and purchasers should look for, offset projects that are third-party verified to the highest international standards and project portfolios that are third-party audited. The annual audit should also be made publicly available. As for cap-and-trade, which is the mechanism to reduce emissions in climate legislation such as the recently passed bill in the House of Representatives, Carlson said, "A cap-and-trade system promotes the most cost-effective carbon reductions, whether internally or externally. Cap-and-trade allows us to tackle climate change in the most cost-effective and fastest way possible." As the goal of climate legislation is to reduce emissions, where the reductions take place isn't important, but that they occur. Like the acid rain experience years ago which used a market-based approach successfully, cap-and-trade will reduce emissions sustainably, equivalent to a 2 to 3 percent reduction per year to achieve the over 80% reductions that the country's aiming for.
Carbonfund.org has always believed that it’s Your Carbon, Your Choice™. So how do you choose? Take a page from the Society for College and University Planning’s book. They gave all the readers of their blog the opportunity to vote on whether they want to support our Reforestation, Renewable Energy, or Energy Efficiency projects. And the winner? Reforestation in a landslide, at least so far. Use this blog posting thread to tell us how you chose which project type to support.
Tuesday, 11 August 2009 18:14

UN Urges Strong CO2 Goals before Climate Talks

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A top climate official of the UN believes the global climate talks in Copenhagen later this year will be crippled- if there are no "strong commitments" from developed nations on slashing CO2 emissions by 2020. De BoerYvo de Boer, executive secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), told Agence France Presse (AFP) in a phone interview that the absence of such commitments "would defeat the whole purpose of the Copenhagen agreement." The Copenhagen talks are meant to negotiate a new climate treaty to succeed the 1997 Kyoto Protocol that expires in 2012. A key area of disagreement is between developed and developing countries. Developing countries have asserted the US, Japan, EU and others should be expected to do more than developing countries to halt climate change. Meanwhile, developed countries have contended that developing countries need to make stronger commitments themselves. The UNFCCC has calculated that, by 2020, the cost of mitigating climate change will rise to about $200 billion annually and adapting to it will rise to $100 billion each year. The sooner that countries can arrive at a plan to reduce emissions systemmatically, the quicker the world can act to keep costs from spiraling. Countries, companies, organizations and individuals have the means to take action now, including carbon offsets that can reduce emissions cost effectively. In Congress, the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 (ACES) passed the House but is awaiting Senate consideration. Photo Credit of Yvo de Boer: AFP
Monday, 10 August 2009 13:59

YouRenew.com Makes Splash with Giant iPhone 3GS

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Rich Littlehale, Co-founder of YouRenewDressed as a giant iPhone, Carbonfund.org CarbonFree® Partner YouRenew.com's Co-Founder Rich Littlehale greeted customers at Apple’s flagship store in Midtown Manhattan. He spread the word of environmental responsibility by encouraging all 3GS buyers to recycle their old cell phones. YouRenew’s innovative approach pays you to recycle your old electronics. It’s simple: Just look up your electronic device, answer a few simple questions about it, ship it, and get paid! On top of that, YouRenew allows you to choose Carbonfund.org’s Renewable Energy projects as the recipient of a donation they make on every recycled electronic device. So today, why don’t you join me and make the YouRenew pledge: "From today forward, I promise that I will recycle all of my electronic devices, to promote a more efficient and clean world."
Rich Littlehale, Co-founder of YouRenew.com
Monday, 10 August 2009 11:12

Some #musicmonday love for @mojaveband

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Vancouver-based band, Mojave, is donating 10% of their album sales to Carbonfund.org to reduce the environmental impact of their tour. Check out this video of "Lights Out", a beautiful song written for Earth Hour. Buy their album, Crow's Funeral>>
Our CarbonFree® partner, Digitope Limited, develops innovative software for working effectively with music, photos and icons. When it comes to taking care of the environment, Digitope is committed to reducing their impact. All Digitope software is sold and delivered over the internet. By distributing their product in an entirely digital manner, they are saving the production of discs, packaging and shrink-wrap and eliminating the need to travel to a store. Digitope makes usage of energy-efficient computers and equipment, recycled paper and their offices are lit with efficient CFL lighting. Software companies across the world are starting to realize great cost savings by switching over to an all-digital distribution model, which not only cuts costs, but prevents a lot of unnecessary materials from being produced. Digitope provide another fantastic example of a company that is committing to reducing what they can!
EMPSi is a consulting firm providing environmental compliance and permitting services to government agencies and private clients. The company focuses on projects expected to have a positive impact on the planet, such as those involving renewable energy and sustainable land and resource management planning. empsiAlso, the company donates 10 percent of net profits to charities, focusing on projects that better the environment. The company operates as paper-free as it can, has flexible work-from-home policies, encourages the use of public transit in commutes, and offsets its carbon footprint. The company's tagline, "Bringing clarity to the complex™," means it has handled complex projects and has applied science, analysis, and creativity to achieve realistic, implementable solutions. Learn more at www.empsi.com.

EMPSi is an consulting firm that provides environmental compliance and permitting services to government agencies and private clients. We focus on projects that have a positive impact on the planet, such as those involving renewable energy and sustainable land and resource management planning.